2019 on Serendipity35

Welcome to another year. This year will mark the start of my 13th year blogging on Serendipity35.

serendipity35As I type this post, the visitor counter says there have been more than 104 million visits overall to the site. Wow. At the end of 2017, we were at 97,123,654 visits and at the end of 2018 the count was 104,587,893 - so we had an amazing 7,464,239 hits on pages for the year. That is actually down from years past when we were closer to a million a month. Maybe blogs are not as popular as they once were. Maybe we lost some faithful followers. Probably it is because I used to write several posts a week but now, in my unretirement, I'm only averaging 1.7 posts per week on Serendipity35. (But I am posting on 8 other sites, so it's not like I am not busy!)

The other counter that visitors don't see is the counter that tracks how many posts I have written. That one tells me that early in 2019 we will pass the 2000 posts mark.  At one time, Tim Kellers would also write on the blog, but for the past few years he has been busy in his academic IT world and keeping the server side of Serendipity35 running.

A Google search on "Serendipity35" bring up mostly posts from this site at the top, along with someone's defunct Twitter account, and a wall mount electric fireplace named "Serendipity 35 inch."

It is early in the year for academic readers. The K-12 teachers around here are back in the classroom tomorrow. College professors get started around the third week of January. I'll start posting again this week and maybe some readers will have some free time to read some thoughts on education for the new semester and year.

Thanks for following the blog.

Serendipity35 Holiday

My colleges are ready to take their winter breaks. People are using up some personal and vacation days to extend the break before and after Christmas and the New Year. And I will take a break from writing here too until the new year. 

Here's wishing all my readers a happy and healthy holiday season and a great new year.

If you can put aside education and technology for a day or week, do it. Refresh your brain. 

2019
   Image via pixabay.com

Blog Followers

I write regularly on five blog sites besides this one. It is always nice to see stats rise on the number of hits and visitors that come to the sites. Some blog platforms allow you to have "followers" - people who are notified when you post something new.

I have noticed something the past few months on two blogs I own that are hosted by Wordpress. There has been a marked increase in followers. That is a good thing, right? Well, yes but ALL of these new followers list an @outlook.com email address. I'm suspicious.

In early 2018, Outlook.com had a reported 400 million active users.That's a lot os users, but that number hasn't increased as much as Gmail's statistics.

But what might these new followers be plotting? Are they bots? Fake Russian accounts hoping to get into my blog and use it for nefarious purposes?

So far, nothing odd has happened concerning these new followers.

Has anyone else reading this found something similar happening with their blog or website?

 

Groundhogs and the Turn of the Year

 

groundhogToday is the anniversary for Serendipity35 which begins its thirteenth year of in existence. It's easy to remember because it is also Groundhog Day here in the U.S.

This is a rather silly celebration that is based on the notion that if the groundhog sees its shadow as it comes out of its den today, we have six weeks of winter to go. If the day is cloudy and the groundhog sees no shadow, it is a sign of coming spring and so it stays above ground. Why a cloudy day would signal an early spring and a sunny day would mean more winter has never made any sense to me.

If there is any fact or even some science to this silly day, it would be in the past. The ancient peoples and our own Native Americans knew that the behavior of animals, insects, and plants could help predict the weather. They took that to mean that these things might also be indicators of the coming and going of seasons. 

Consider it weather lore, but there are lots of ideas about how to predict the severity of winter based on natural indicators. If I want to make some leap to education here, I guess I would have to say that we do look to trends outside education (business, technology, media etc.) as ways to predict where education might be headed. I'm working on a piece for next week today about how corporate professional learning is pulling educators into top roles at companies like Amazon. Will that affect higher education?

My Groundhog Day tradition has become to watch the film, Groundhog Day, which I have seen many times (which is actually pretty meta if you know what the film is about). I believe that the film is a whole lot more than just a comedy, and I am not alone in that opinion. Connect the movie to education? Well, I have seen in my 40 years in education a lot of repeating of things with little changes in the hopes of making things better - a theme of the film. Most of the time it results in minor improvements, sometimes in worst results, but we keep trying new approaches. Sometimes we see sunshine or clouds and think it will indicate what is to come. It is a 50/50 possibility, so why not predict.

I do know that the vernal equinox will arrive on time, but even that may or may not mean that springlike weather will arrive. And I do know that the spring semester will end on time and a new one will begin whether or not we see a shadow.

  

Hello Global Visitors

Hello

It is always interesting to check the stats at the end of the month and look at where readers have come from on the globe.

You can get a peek at the most recent visitors by checking out the Live Traffic in the sidebar. I grabbed a sample (shown below) that illustrates what a great diversity of global visitors find Serendipity35.

 

visitors